Making Your Wardrobe More Sustainable In 2019

As the world slowly starts to wake up to the devastating effects our actions are having on the planet – it’s evident that environmentalism is on the rise. How we can be more sustainable and ethical in our practices is the hot topic on practically everyones lips.

With the plastic issues, meat consumption and fossil fuel issues being widely spoken about, it’s time we woke up to the effects our wardrobe choices have on the environment too.

Having studied Fashion for nearing on 4 years now, I’ve witnessed first hand the environment falling apart due to fast fashion and consumerism. The mind set, which was once buying clothes as a long term investment has shifted, to people buying into lower quality clothes…and more of them. Peoples connection with fashion is basically ever changing, and not for the better either.

There is about a million and one different reasons why this fast fashion and consumerism society has become normalised, but one thing we can all collectively agree on is that the use of social media has massively influenced this movement (much like it influencing nearly everything nowadays). With influencers posting different outfits on the daily, purchasable through just one click, it’s never been easier to shop.

It’s clear that the consumerism society we live in is killing the planet. It’s heating up the climate, destroying habitats, using vast excessive amounts of water, and creates heaps of deadly toxins. Oh, and lets not forget to address the millions of workers being exploited to keep the fast fashion industry ticking away.

I’ve painted a fairly dull picture here haven’t I? I guess this was kind of my intention in a way. Being a fashion blogger, I hold my hands up to unnecessarily buying clothes. But I’m now making a conscious effort to be more sustainable and ethical in my shopping, and I think you should too – heres my top 10 tips for a more sustainable wardrobe!

Be More Informed

I think this is probably the easiest one to start of with. When it comes to sustainable and ethical fashion, people tend not to give a second thought to it due to not having the knowledge on it. Once you find out how easy it is to incorporate into your daily life and also the positive effect it has on the environment, you’ll have wished you had always done it!

Shop Smarter

Buy second hand, swap clothes with friends and family – you’ll be amazed at the hidden gems you can find lurking in the depths of charity shops! Also, this one goes without saying, source out better quality garments. Shop upper-market for clothes that you won’t have to get rid of after 5 minutes!

Consume Less

It’s no secret consumerism is a massive problem, like huge. However, we can change this. If we all start shopping less for clothes that aren’t going to last long – the positive change this will have on the environment and society in general will be colossal!

Think About Fabric Choice 

This one isn’t as easy as the others because granted finding clothes that are made of  completely natural materials is sometimes easier said than done. Having said this, making sure your clothes are ethically sourced, and have the fair trade logo will mean you’re doing your bit. You’ll be surprised at how many companies now stock fair trade materials!

Extend The Life Of Your Clothes 

Whether you’re reusing it, or sewing it back together – extend the life of your clothes for as long as possible. Not only this, but if you aren’t going to wear it again, take it to charity! I can’t stress enough how easy this is to do, and how much more sustainable it is than just throwing your clothes away!

30 Wears Test

Before buying any garment, think to yourself, can I see myself wearing this 30 times. Do I love it that much that I will wear it more than once? If the answer is yes, then buy it! If it’s not, put it down and walk away my friend! Stop buying into that consumerism society, you don’t need that new jacket, you already have 10!

Take Better Care Of Your Clothes 

Wash them at cooler temperatures so that you can keep the colour richer for longer. Not only this but learn how to repair your clothes. Sewing is a really easy – not to mention pretty useful skill to pick up!

Invest In Trans-Seasonal Garments 

I’m guilty of having practically a whole wardrobe for each season, when in reality no one needs that. Buying pieces that you can transition from spring into summer pieces, or even summer into winter pieces with a bit of layering, will not only help you save a bit of money, but will also help save the planet (and a bit of wardrobe space)!

Always Recycle Your Clothes 

Do not, I repeat do not ever throw your clothes in the bin! Just because you aren’t going to wear it again doesn’t mean that somebody else wouldn’t love to have it! There are hundreds of textile banks dotted around the country and they basically do all the hard work for you. You drop your clothes off, then they recycle or up-cycle the garment into something new…genius!

Go For Quality Over Quantity 

As pretty as that £10 skirt in Primark may be, if we’re honest it isn’t going to last long at all. We’re all better off if when we are shopping, going to places slightly more upper market. It’s easier to find out where your clothes are from and their materials – not only this, but I can assure you your money will go so much further, whats not to love?!

I think it is human nature to want to treat yourself to something new, but we all need to widen up to the damage we could all be guilty of causing. It’s so easy to turn your wardrobe into a sustainable one, and if you haven’t done so already, I really hope this blog post gives you the little push you need to do so!

How do you incorporate sustainability into your everyday life?!

All my love,

Han xx

11 thoughts on “Making Your Wardrobe More Sustainable In 2019

  1. I’ve been vegan since 2013 and since then I’ve been progressively changing my lifestyle. I certainly want to make my wardrobe more sustainable. I do take care of my stuff and have some pieces for over 20 years. But now I’m starting to make more and more responsible choices when it comes to clothes shopping. Are you going to take part in any of the fashion revolution events in April? Thanks for sharing these great tips.
    https://www.daisyandthyme.com/thyme-to-cook-daisys-kitchen-vegan-sweet-potato-buns/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve always wanted to go vegan, but I think I would miss cheese to much, it’s amazing you’ve been able to stick to it for so long! Ooo I actually might do, I’m off for 4 weeks in April, so that seems like a perfect way to spend my time! x

      Like

  2. This is a super helpful post! I really like the idea of the 30 wears question because it makes us think instead of impulsively buying. I’m quite good at keeping clothes for ages and wearing them lots because I like to make the most of my money. But I do want to try second hand buying more often to combat picking up something cheap in Primark!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. studied fashion a few years back too and it is ridiculous just exactly what fast fashion culture does to the world. I ended up being a really ‘bad’ fashion student because I stopped shopping – I have maybe two ‘shops’ a year (apart from shoes) and I try to make sure that my purchases are as clean as they can be. I donate clothes on a regular basis too. I recently found out about washing clothes cooler helps stop colour fade as well – and I really love you wears idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. These are such great tips! I’ve never heard of the ‘30 wears test’ but it’s such a great idea! Definitely think it’s important to be aware of where our clothes come from and how they are made. Great post!!

    Like

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